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What are my chances of getting a green card if I have a criminal record?

You can still obtain a green card despite having a criminal history. You can therefore apply to be a legal permanent resident of the US, notwithstanding your criminal history. However, in order to be eligible, both you and your criminal history must meet certain requirements, and some elements of your history may disqualify you. This manual outlines who is eligible, what criminal histories bar entry to the United States, and how to obtain a green card despite having a criminal past.

Before submitting a green card application, you should speak with an attorney if you have a criminal history or if you’re unsure if the things on your record qualify as crimes. With certain restrictions, people with criminal records can obtain a green card. Your lawyer at Pollak Immigration, PLLC will be able to respond to your inquiries and guide you through the procedure.

Can Someone With A Criminal Record Apply For A Green Card?

If you have a criminal history, it is still feasible to obtain a green card. Only a few sorts of criminal histories, however, are acceptable according to US immigration law. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services will reject your application if you have committed one of the offences that disqualify you from entering the country.

Does USCIS perform Background Checks?

Every applicant’s background is investigated by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. This organisation checks both the applicant’s and the sponsor’s criminal histories (the individuals who will receive benefits from USCIS if they approve the petition).

When requesting a green card, must you disclose your criminal history?

As well as providing accurate information on your application, you are legally obligated to be truthful. You might be engaging in immigration fraud if you don’t. You must therefore disclose your criminal background on your green card application. You ought to mention:

  • Arrests
  • Charges
  • Convictions

You should let USCIS know about the situation even if you were detained and then released. Arrests that don’t result in charges are generally recorded on a person’s criminal history.

The USCIS should be informed of every detail of your criminal history when you apply for a green card. Minor traffic offences are the only item you are not needed to mention, but you are expected to disclose traffic offences that also constitute crimes, such as drunk driving and reckless driving.

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